Keeping It 100 with Sheriff Chad Chronister

"This is how we're going to break that cycle of recidivism."

Episode Summary

The Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office offers inmates dozens of services and programs at both the Orient Road and Falkenburg Road Jails in hopes of improving their lives post-incarceration. Why should the public care about this topic? Sheriff Chad Chronister answers that question and more while highlighting the Veterans Resurgence Program, Vocational Training Program, and others in hopes of breaking the cycle of recidivism in Hillsborough County.

Episode Transcription

Merissa Lynn, Host:

Hello everybody. Welcome to this edition of Keeping It 100. I'm your host, Merissa Lynn.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

Today, we have a different episode. We're going to be taking a look inside of our jails, and the several programs that we have that are offered to the inmates to hopefully better their lives and prepare them for life after incarceration.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

As always, we have our sheriff, Sheriff Chad Chronister. Thank you for being with us today. How are you

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

Hello, everyone. I'm wonderful. I couldn't be more excited to speak about this topic, and have Darlene here today, who's just our program coordinator, all-around guru. Very exciting topic to be able to be discussed here today.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

Yeah. Darlene Hansford, she is joining us. She is our guest for this episode of the podcast. She's the Director of Services and Programs at the Department of Detention Services here at HCSO. Darlene, thanks for being with us today.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

Absolutely. Hi, Merissa. Thank you, Sheriff, for doing this for this important topic.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

The amount of programs, it's dozens and dozens, that we offer to the inmates. It's faith based, it's substance abuse, obviously the veterans resurgence program, et cetera, et cetera. I guess this is a question for both of you. I'll start with you, Sheriff. Why should the public care about the amount of programs that we offer inmates, to hopefully better their lives?

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

You said it perfectly. We have an opportunity to improve someone's life. Whether it's faith based, maybe it's a basic life skills course, maybe it's an addiction type of treatment program that we'll get into later here, mental health that so many individuals are suffering from. We have a program for everyone.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

Darlene, how would you go about answering that question? Why should the public care?

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

Well, the biggest reason to care is nobody stays in jail forever. County jails are, by their nature, a temporary residence for everybody. People booked into the jail are either sent to state prison, transferred to another jurisdiction or treatment program, or they go back into our community. So they're coming back, back to live where they came from.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

Last year, there were over 39,000 bookings in the Orient Road Jail. The average daily population last year was 3,000 inmates. The vast majority of those men and women were released right back into our community. Rehabilitation through education, treatment programs, job skills, and religious services just makes sense both socially and financially.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

If we can reduce recidivism at the local level by providing services to inmates, we create less victims, send less inmates to state prison, and we as taxpayers pay less to incarcerate inmates. FDOC estimates it costs $23,000 a year to incarcerate a state prisoner. That doesn't count what we pay in the county jail.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

I want to thank the sheriff for supporting these programs and understanding what it means to help these people, because they're getting out.

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

Wholeheartedly, and she said it perfectly. They're coming back to our community. They're not going to disappear somewhere on some special island. They're coming back.

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

Well, we all talk about truly breaking the cycle of recidivism. That's why we do this. These programs significantly impact ... I'm so excited as we get into each program and the impact it will have on an individual's life. But this is how we're going to break that cycle of recidivism here in the county. This is how we're going to keep our crime rate low in Hillsborough County.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

Again, the Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office offers more than 40 programs to inmates, substance abuse, faith-based, educational, mental health-based. Darlene, you oversee these programs. How effective have they been with the inmates?

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

I think the programs and services offered in the jails have been extremely effective in providing inmates with the education, tools and skills to successfully reenter our community.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

The HCSO treatment counselors, case managers, chaplains, our clerical support staff are all dedicated professionals who truly believe in what they do to prepare inmates to reenter the community. They facilitate, as you were saying, Merissa, the substance abuse treatment program, domestic violence prevention program, parenting classes, a plethora of life skills classes. Our chaplains provide personal individual spiritual guidance and counseling to inmates.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

How are these inmates able to sign up for these programs? I know we've talked about, between you and I, we've talked about the kiosk. Is that essentially how they're able to volunteer to sign up for these services?

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

Absolutely. We provide a kiosk in every pod in the jail, including our confinement units. The inmates can sign up. They just go on the computer, sign themselves up. They can also send a request slip to us if, for some reason, they're having trouble getting onto the computer. There are various ways of getting them onto the programs.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

We also, in addition to the programs offered by [Teammate CSO 00:05:20], the Hillsborough County public schools provide teachers that teach juveniles K to 12, and our adult men and women in the jails, the GED class. 

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

I think that's important just to focus on here for a minute. We created a separate juvenile pod. Well, these juveniles are going to go on to be adults and still coexist here, again, in our community. Darlene's done a wonderful job of making sure ... "Listen. You're here for whatever reason. We can't help why you're here. Why not get educated while you're here." Maybe speak on that a little bit, the participation and how successful that that program has been.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

Yeah. The GEDs, at one point we did more GEDs in the county jail than they did in the county. That's back when the jail was highly populated. The numbers have been a little bit less. But we have eight teachers on site. The Hillsborough public schools dedicate staff to help these inmates. They get their GEDs while in jail. The juveniles, some of them get their traditional K to 12 education. Some of them go on to college afterwards.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

Sheriff, to segue into some of the particular programs that are offered. You have been so passionate. I've only been here about a year, but you've been so passionate about some of these programs, most of these programs, I should say. Why is this such an important thing for you, as sheriff, to make sure that these inmates have these services and programs to improve their lives?

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

Well, it's just not the humanity factor, because it's what we should be doing. But it's the factor where we're changing, we're saving people's lives. They're going to be reintroduced back into our community. This is an opportunity for them to change that course of criminal behavior, whatever's led them here, and let them know that, "Hey, listen. Someone cares. There's another opportunity and a different way of life.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

I want to start by talking about some of the particular programs. The first one is the Veterrans Resurgence Program. This was definitely your brainchild. This program was launched just over a year ago. What led you to create this program specifically for inmates who have served our country in the armed forces?

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

My grandfather raised me. He was a World War II veteran. I had always grew up ... Phenomenal, had such a positive, significant impact in my life. But he always spoke about the struggles, how he transitioned back into society, and how difficult it was even to transition back into his own family.

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

So as I became the sheriff, I'm like, "Hey, now I have a platform. I have an opportunity." That always resonated with me like, "Hey, listen. Why aren't we doing more for our veterans?" We have more veterans living in Hillsborough County than anywhere else in the State of Florida, than anywhere else in the country.

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

Why not provide an opportunity to those vets who served our community, and now are suffering as a result of that service, to be able to help them transition back into society, whether that's with addiction treatment, whether that's with mental health treatment, or again, if it's back to how to balance a checkbook, and some of the basic life skills that some of us take for granted.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

These veterans, they have their own pod, Darlene.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

Yes.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

They have a pod that has the insignia of all of the branches of the armed forces. What exactly are the services, maybe different from some of the other programs, that are offered specifically to these veterans?

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

Sure. The insignias were painted by one of the first participants in the program. We bought the paint supplies. It's beautiful in there. That is some tremendous artwork.

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

You walk in there, and you immediately get that overwhelming sense of pride. Every time you bring up a vet's branch of service, it doesn't matter how low they are, they immediately smile and get that overwhelming sense of pride. They each have a flag of service over their bed.

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

But Darlene, working with the inmates that were there, that were a part of this original program, and the insignias that they've painted, almost like a mural painted. I get goosebumps every time I walk into the pod.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

Yeah, it's tremendous in there. The environment is calming. It gives them some support. They're able to get their pride back from the time they served in the military.

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

They're able to help each other. It's a veterans helping veterans. I can't pretend to know what they're suffering or what's ailing them, but they can talk. There's so much group therapy that occurs each and every day, formal and informal. I think it's veterans helping veterans, even veterans ...

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

Darlene's made some tremendous progress where some of the veterans even teach some of the courses. They study the curriculum and now they're teaching. I think that helps them heal. That's a part of therapy as well.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

The curriculum that they have there, what are some of the courses? What are some of the things that they're taught inside that pod?

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

They do some life skills classes. The first step in this program is very important to the sheriff. We had to pick the right people. We picked a treatment counselor, Frank [Pressy 00:10:26], who served 20 years in the military. He was in the US Army in intelligence. While he was in there, he got his degree in social work. So he's somebody who cared about giving back. The deputies assigned to that pod, also, for the vast part, are veterans themselves. So they understand the need to give back.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

In there, Frank teaches them life skills training, which is personal money management, employability skills, how to get a job when you get out, how to do an interview. And pathways to change, thinking about why you're here, what you did to get here, and how to change that.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

We also, as the sheriff mentioned, the inmates learn how to facilitate those classes as a leadership tool. They turn around and teach each other, support each other in there.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

We also have a morning physical exercise every Monday to Friday that they participate in. Mental health and substance abuse risk and needs assessment is completed. NaphCare, a medical provider, does courses in there for them doing psycho-education groups with USF masters of social work interns. They do an eight-week course as well to help them manage stress, anger, coping with mood, anxiety issues, transition skills, medical topics, healing and recovering from trauma.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

We have veterans justice outreach specialists from the VA who come in there and hook them up with services when they get out. We also have people from the crisis center who come in and help those inmates that are in crisis.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

So there's a plethora of programs in there that help them get back that dignity and walk out of there with pride and able to be successful again.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

Sheriff, I know you've been in that pod several times over the last several months. When you're in there, you're talking to these inmates. What did they say to you about this program?

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

I tell you what, this is going to sound like an embellishment, but it's not. When I was in there last time, we received a letter from an inmate. Obviously, I remember, because his name's Chad too. Talked about him and his significant other, "I've moved to Virginia." With the counseling he got, and the group therapy, and everything that he attained while he was there, he's gainfully employed, has his own house, living with his significant other. He said, quite simply, "This saved my life."

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

We all say, "If we can just help one person." We get it all the time. We have someone writing a book that's there right now. But you always hear, "Hey, thank you. This, this helped me so much. It's the first time I felt like I belonged somewhere since I left the military." I think it's for all these reasons that we deem it such a success and that is that it's so beneficial.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

Chad is just one of the dozens of examples of people that have graduated from that program. Right now, we currently have 30 enrolled in it.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

Yeah, there are 30 participants in there now. I can tell you, echoing what the sheriff said, every time I go into that pod, one of those guys stops me and says, "Thank you. Thank you, Sheriff Chronister, for bringing this. This has made a big difference in my life." Some of them have been in programs in other counties or jurisdictions. They say, "This is nothing like it." Some of them just house them. We give them the tools and skills they need to go back into our society and be successful.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

Yeah. It's amazing what's being done over there. I've been in there myself, and it's just nice to be able to see these guys feel like they have a place that they can call home, and eventually they will go through the program and go home themselves.

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

All part of the healing process. You're exactly right.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

Exactly. I want to get into the next program that we're going to be highlighting today. That is the Vocational Training Program. This was one that we attempted to open at the beginning of the year, but unfortunately, because of the coronavirus, it got postponed until-

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

COVID had other plans.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

Yeah. We had what was our grand opening at the beginning of March, and then unfortunately-

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

In March, yeah.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

COVID hit, and that took a different turn. Darlene, I'm going to start with you this time. This is a program that offers welding training, automotive training, et cetera. What other kinds of training is offered here at the Vocational Training Center?

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

It's just what you said, Merissa. Initially, we're going to do an automotive training. It's a teacher currently in the public schools who's doing that. There's going to be basic welding technology, learning stick. We have state-of-the-art equipment that we purchase through the inmate canteen fund.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

Something important to mention, there are no taxpayer dollars expended for any of these services. These are profits that are derived from the inmates buying Snickers bar at the same price you and I would buy them at the store. The profits go back to help the inmates. Everything in there was paid for. The teachers that are going to be on-site are going to be paid for through this fund. So the taxpayers aren't paying a penny for this.

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

Yeah. This is truly inmates helping inmates.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

Yeah. This facility, I should mention that it's several thousand square feet.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

10,000.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

10,000 square feet of just an entire center where all of these trainings will take place. Sheriff, you've often talked about holistic healing, that sort of thing. How is this part of that process? Why was the Vocational Training Center brought here to HCSO?

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

Yeah. A big part of our vision moving forward, three years ago when I became the sheriff, was to get people healthy, we've done that with our substance abuse programs, our mental health, then provide them some type of education. We get that through our 43 educational programs that we have.

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

Then I think the next natural course of progression is to provide them with the skill set that they can use when they get out of jail, to help them towards that path of success. Basic automotive mechanic, basic forklift operator with all the different warehouses. There's a big cry and demand for forklift operators. They'll get certified in that. Basic welding, basic HVAC systems.

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

Then again, Darlene has done a wonderful job, once they complete this program, to work with CareerSource Tampa Bay, local trade unions, local different employers. So now we've gone from helping you heal and get you healthy; get you educated, provide you a skillset; now even to the point where you leave here with gainful employment, with how they help with interview techniques and build a resume and everything else. Again, it's just helping to truly break that cycle of recidivism.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

Yeah, essentially these people that go through this program, they'll walk out the door with a certificate in hand. They'll hopefully have had help with their resume. So there'll be able to gain employment should somebody want to hire them.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

Absolutely. Our case managers that we hired to run this program are going to help them, like the sheriff said, build a resume, do some job searches. They're going to teach classes on life skills, which will be the employability skills, learning about how to build a resume, how to interview, doing mock interviews, how to dress, dealing with a difficult situation at work, angry customers, things we all deal with every day, and we know not to get angry with it.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

They'll assist with job applications. They've already networked with some employers that'll help these men and women get jobs when they get out. They're also going to help them with financial, personal money management class, learning how to write a check, learning how to open a savings account, saving their money, not going into debt and all of that sort of thing.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

These are all very important life skills that anybody, any one of us should have.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

Absolutely.

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

You've heard me say it a million times, that everyone deserves a second chance. This is the opportunity for them to make the most of that next chance.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

The Vocational Training Center has yet to open, but it will open on October 5th. They're going to start with the automotive mechanic training there, and then it'll progress into the welding, et cetera, et cetera. We're excited to see that finally be put to use on October 5th.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

We are. We were so disappointed. We had some depressed people when we didn't open. It was mid- March and the world changed. This was one of the first directives the sheriff gave detention when he became sheriff here is, "I want to see these people leave with skills so they can get jobs and not come back to jail."

Merissa Lynn, Host:

Yeah. We're all looking forward to seeing that. One of the other programs I want to get into is our substance abuse program. It is the only law enforcement agency that is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities. Darlene, what does that mean exactly?

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

It means we ... It was over 2,000 standards. It's a very high level. It shows that we have a high level of treatment. Our counselors in that program all really believe in what they do. They're not here to get rich and go further here. A lot of them have been here 15 ... We have one who's been here 30 years. They are a dedicated group of treatment staff.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

We were licensed by the Department of Children and Families to run this program. It started in about 1987. So it's been a long time. They changed and added accreditation just to make sure people are doing the treatment they're saying they're doing.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

It was a difficult accreditation, something we weren't used to in substance abuse, having to document. We changed some things. We put a lot of things in electronic format now. But first try around, we were given the highest level of accreditation. Three years.

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

Darlene's very humble. She's done a phenomenal job of making sure that the Hillsborough County detention facility has the first and only state-certified drug rehabilitative program. That means that our inmates who are suffering from substance abuse are getting the highest level of treatment available.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

Sheriff, the theme that I've sensed here so far is that it's really just about making sure that these inmates, when they leave the walls of the jail, that their lives are better. No matter what service or program they take part in, there is a wide range. Again, there's over 40 programs and services offered by the jail. This is the story about getting these people's, their lives better so that when they walk out, they know how to readapt into society.

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

Improving someone's life, providing another opportunity and the ability to make the most of that opportunity, while breaking the cycle of recidivism, keeping the crime rate low here in Hillsborough County.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

October 1st, we're talking about the beginning of the month here. This is the 10th anniversary, 10 years of HCSO's re-entry program. It's a voluntary program for newly released people who can get help with jobs, housing, food stamps. The case managers, they work directly with them, and eventually do keep in touch with them. How successful has this program been for the jails?

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

I think it's been extremely successful. The case managers there don't just work with the inmates released from jail. They work with inmates coming out of state prison. It's collocated with our registration unit, which per Florida statute, anybody getting out of state prison, coming back to the county, has to register. We take their fingerprints, photographs.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

But while they're there, "Do you need help? Do you have housing? Do you need food stamps? Do you need us to apply for medical care?" They hook them up with all that. They help them with job searches. We have a partnership there with Northside Mental Health. They've been on site a little bit longer than that, providing mental health, people with mental health casework.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

We have some people who they typically try to stay in touch six months. We have one guy, the first guy who's been out still keeps in touch with his case manager 10 years on October 1st.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

That must be so fulfilling, to know that what you guys have done to help these people have improved their lives immensely, to look back and be like, "Wow, all these years later, this guy is still doing really well."

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

It does. You hear from them frequently how well they're doing. They keep in touch with inmates who got out of our drug programs and tell us, "Thank you to that treatment counselor. You made a big difference in my life." This particular first inmate who got out ...

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

I started my career here at the Sheriff's Office. I've been here 30 years. Thank you, Sheriff, for letting me stay here that whole time.

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

You kidding me? What a tremendous asset you are. I have to comment. There were people that heard how great this program was. Their time was up, their time served, and they were to be released. It was before we expand the program. They couldn't get into the program, and they were begging the judges to allow them to stay in jail longer to go to that. I'm like, "No, that's kidnapping. We can't keep you here. We're not allowed to do that." But just to show you how wonderful the programs ...

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

Again, we're not going to be able to touch on them. We've been able to highlight some of the most impactful programs. But again, Darlene, I don't know how to show my gratitude for what you do. If you're an inmate who's willing to get help, and whatever that help may be, you've touched that individual in some way, shape or form. On behalf of our whole community, thank you for what you do.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

Well, thank you. These programs can be done with our staff. I want to thank all of our treatment counselors, our case managers, our chaplains, our clerical staff, who really care. They're not it to become millionaires. They are in it to help people better their lives.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

During this pandemic, James Evans, who runs our treatment programs, they continued to do in-person treatment, social distancing and as cautious as possible. We kept doing these court order classes. We met individually with inmates who needed help with reentry. Our chaplains continued to provide that counseling. So thank you to all the program staff.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

Yeah, it sounds like everybody in detention has really made the best of a really unprecedented situation here in our lives, in our lifetime.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

I guess one of the other questions I do want to ask, is there any way that the public can help if they want to help? I know one thing that you mentioned was about a clothes closet as part of the reentry program. People can donate clothes and other items to help. When these people leave the walls of the jail, how can they help them?

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

Yeah. We do have a clothes closet over at our registration of the reentry unit. We will gladly accept any gently used clothing or hygiene items. We also use it for our homeless outreach deputies. They use clothes from there. Chaplain Lopez has been a huge provider of clothes. She's got so many connections in the community to bring them there.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

I have to thank, we have over 300 volunteers in the jail. These are men and women in the community who perform religious services and self-betterment classes for the inmates in the jail. Prior to COVID, we had over 50 religious services with about a thousand inmates signed up for them. We hope, as the threat lessens, to bring all of them back.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

Yeah.

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

I'm sorry to interrupt there.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

You're good.

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

A tremendous debt of gratitude we owe those volunteers in the community. What can you do to help? Get involved. We have so many people that do, that provide that selfless service without compensation, knowing that they want to make their community better. From donating clothes to donating their time to these programs, what an impact they're having on our community.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

If somebody is listening, is there a particular place where they can go to sign up to volunteer?

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

Sure. They could either get on our website, do a public request through the website, or they can certainly call me. I believe my number is listed on there, but it's 247-8834. I'll happily take their information. The more people that are helping these returning citizens succeed, the better their chances are going to be.

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

Where's the collection point for donating clothes, if someone's listening and wants to do that, Darlene?

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

That is at our reentry center, which is 1800 Orient Road.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

Perfect.

Darlene Hansford, HCSO Detention Services:

We'll gladly take anything. We have volunteers who sort out those clothes, and make sure people have the appropriate clothing to get jobs.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

It's an amazing service to be offered to them. Sheriff, any closing remarks, just about everything, all the programs, all the services that are offered in our jails?

Sheriff Chad Chronister:

It's very, very gratifying to know that we're being able, again, to change, improve someone's life, provide a better opportunity, and at the same time, being the crime fighter that I'd love to be in 29 years, knowing that we're keeping the crime rate low, because we're showing them there's a different path than that criminal behavior path that they had. Whether it's making them healthy, whether it's education, whether it's a vocational skill set, regardless of what it is, faith-based, it doesn't make a difference. Equipping them, again, to make the most of that second opportunity.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

I think that's the perfect way to leave off this episode. Thank you, Sheriff, for being with us. Thank you, Darlene, for being with us. I really enjoyed this conversation. Thank you both for your time.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

I also want to let the viewers know that we do have another podcast here at HCSO. It's called Unfinished Business. It's a cold case podcast where we cover unsolved homicides, unsolved missing persons cases. Please check that out. You can just search on Google Play, Apple Podcasts, Spotify. Please search for "Unfinished Business" to check out those episodes. We've got eight of them out right now. That's our complete first season. Please check it out. If you have any information about those cases to please call us at (813) 247-8200.

Merissa Lynn, Host:

Thank you everybody for joining us.